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Volume 8

How vulnerability can give you a leadership edge

3 minute read

Hello Amazing!

I really believe that we can all benefit from practicing more vulnerability in all aspects of our lives. But there’s one domain that I’m extra interested in: vulnerability in leadership.

What does it mean?

For starters, I hope we can all agree that it’s potent stuff. We all look to leaders—both the formal leaders with rank and the informal leaders—to be role models. What they do, what they say, and especially how they do it, gets amplified. For better and for worse. Let’s explore why and how.

Here’s the thing I’ve noticed when looking at vulnerability in leadership: The vulnerability sweet spot is a much narrower window. Under pressure, with lots of people around, things moving quickly, the space between ‘too soon’ and ‘too late’ is small. You can’t plan and rehearse too far in advance, then it just feels forced. But too raw and spontaneous can be confusing and uncomfortable for everyone. You really need to learn to recognize when the moment is just right and at the same time hit the right dosage.

Within that narrow sweet spot, you have an opportunity to do something for the benefit of the whole. Let me give you two examples:

1/ Setting a warm tone in the beginning of a meeting and opening up the space for others to bring more of themselves into the conversation. I’ve seen a leader who would enter every meeting telling a small story (not a 7 minute “small story” but literally 30-40 seconds) about some little mistake or issue she had that morning. Not in an angry or frustrated way, but in a light and fun and self deprecating way, laughing warmly at her own silliness. Nothing that required a follow up or risked derailing the meeting agenda in any way. But everyone’s shoulders came down and the meeting started from that tone. That was an example of frequent small doses that served a shared purpose: disarming tension in meetings, efficiently and reliably.

2/ On the grand scale, it can be an explicit ask. During the pandemic, I saw a CEO ask all employees to take a voluntary, temporary pay cut in order to preserve liquidity in a worst case scenario, avoiding immediate layoffs (with a promise to pay it back in case the worst case could be averted). That’s a pretty big ask to make, and there’s no guarantee that people will accept. It could have truly backfired. But it was so genuine—the whole company and everyone’s jobs were on the line—and you could feel how humbling it was to make that ask. It was also an appeal to think about the whole and not just oneself. That’s why it’s so powerful. The individual sacrifice serves a shared purpose, and everyone gets to feel that their actions are meaningful and contributing. The genuine ask allows the recipient to become part of a shared narrative and play an active role in the outcome.

It’s such a fine balance because if your vulnerable approach seems the least bit calculated, it will have the exact opposite effect. If it feels performative (“Just look at the tears in my eyes as proof of how touched I am by my own story”) or even competitive (“There is no way you can top my bravery now”) people will likely feel alienated, manipulated and in the worst cases emotionally violated. When it’s bad, it’s bad!

However, I’ve seen first hand how some leaders do it so well that they can melt away cynicism and fear within minutes.

Much love

Mathias

This is part 3 of 3.

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Volume 8

How do you find your own vulnerability sweet spot?

4 minute read

Hello Amazing!

In the previous post we looked at why vulnerability and openness is so important for social connection. But how do you actually share with vulnerability?

Remember, the goal is to share something in a way that builds human connection. If we only share our success and when we are on top, the projection can make others feel inferior and hold back with sharing what is actually going on for them. The relationship becomes superficial. But the solution isn’t to share all things right away, making it all completely raw and unfiltered. This isn’t vulnerability. It’s just oversharing, and it has all its own issues: in extreme cases it feels completely inappropriate, and the recipient can feel violated (and yes, I’ve done it too!). It can also be triggering for others, who may have had similar experiences.

Let’s take an example of something I’ve tried a few times now: getting laid off from a job. I’ve been laid off due to restructuring, where my work would be chunked up and given to freelancers. I’ve also been asked to think about a “transition plan” which was code for “you are not delivering to the expectation.” Technically speaking it was me who quit, but it wasn’t exactly voluntarily or on my own timeline.

On the day it happens and immediately after, it’s been so raw. I’ve been in a bit of a shock, not sure what was up and down. This isn’t a good time to share, except with our closest friends and family. The people who for better or worse will have to endure us in that state.

When it comes to sharing more widely, for example on social media, I find that a useful way to look at this, is not to think so much about how to share vulnerably, but to focus on when. Then the how will follow.

If you think of it as a timeline, there is a window of opportunity somewhere in between that initial shock and being back in full safety (You’ve seen those Instagram posts: “First day at my new job. So excited about all my smart new colleagues. Btw. the communal lunch is incredible.” ).

What we are looking for is the vulnerability sweet spot. It has to be recent enough that you are still affected by it. It still matters. But not so recent that it’s too raw. Let’s take a closer look.

To find out if you are sharing too late: if you are already ‘safe’ again (new job, new wife, etc.) and really just telling others what you went through, even if it was hell and absolutely terrible, it probably isn’t vulnerability that you are showing. It’s more likely showing off what you’ve overcome. There’s nothing in it for the recipient. If all they can do is give you a toast and say ‘wow, congratulations’, you are ‘proving’ not ‘sharing’. Yes, I’m guilty of this too.

So what’s too soon? Imagine that you share online what you are going through and someone leaves a comment. If it’s too raw, you are still feeling a need to be seen and feel validated, for example through supportive comments. Thus, when it turns out that the comment is not really about you and what you posted, it’s the other person sharing their own struggle, you get frustrated. I’ve been there too. In those moments, keep sharing with trusted friends, whom you can count on for that kind of support.

If, however, in this thought experiment, you feel grounded enough that you could appreciate others’ stories and experiences as a positive thing and not be counting on them to validate your experience, you’re in the sweet spot. When you do vulnerability well, people will reciprocate and share a bit of themselves. You are helping people be more vulnerable and share a bit more of themselves because they are following your example.

So it’s a ‘when’ to share more than a ‘how’. But how long time are we talking about? Days, weeks, months? It depends on what happened. And it depends on you!

The first time I got laid off, I didn’t tell the full story until 10 months later, where I felt I had enough solid ground under my feet, but still had it fresh enough in my memory to share the emotional part as well. Check out my annual report from 2016 and judge for yourself. Does it feel too early or too late or does it land somewhere in the sweet spot?

Last but not least: we can’t get it right every time. Many times we won’t know if we are too early or too late until it’s too late. Be patient with yourself. Know what you are aiming for and notice whenever you are a little bit off.

In the next issue we will take this theme of vulnerability one step further and look at how you can also use it as a leadership advantage.

Until then

Much love

Mathias

This is part 2 of 3.

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Volume 8

“I thought you had it all figured out”

2 minute read

Hello Amazing!

This is the first of three newsletters diving into the topic of vulnerability and openness: why it matters so much, when to do it and how to use it effectively as a leader.

The story begins back in January (remember January?). My wife and I were getting ready to leave NYC, and everyone was asking “Do you have a job lined up?” I hated that question because the answer was ‘no’, and whenever I had to answer the question I felt exposed.

On January 20th, just 10 days before we left, I got offered a job at Implement Consulting Group. I was so happy. Finally I could put that pesky question to rest and update my LinkedIn: look at how successful I am! My God I loved that.

Fast forward through a pandemic, life crisis and being let go again from the job, I’ve been reaching out to old friends, sharing my struggle and asking for help.

One person wrote back: “I’m surprised to hear from you. I thought you had it all figured out.”

This comment hit me. I’ve been working intentionally with vulnerability and openness for more than nine years, so I thought I was as open as one could be. However, to him, and maybe others, I had still seemed unapproachable. He told me that he too had been struggling lately, something I probably wouldn’t have heard about if I hadn’t shared my own struggle first.

From being unapproachable it can quickly get worse. The more successful you appear, the more likely it is that others will feel inferior around you. That can turn into insecurity and even envy. All of which makes it harder to have a strong relationship. More success projection means less human connection.

The solution obviously isn’t to replace all your success stories with negative stories of misery and self pity. But what then? In the next issue, we will dive into some very tangible ways, you can practice sharing more vulnerability without falling into the trap of oversharing.

Until then

Much love

Mathias

This is part 1 of 3.

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Volume 7

#7.28 How to stay extra human

Hello Amazing!

Even before Covid-19 closed down most of the world, our work and lives in general are increasingly mediated through technology. I spend as much time looking at my friends’ lives on Instagram or sending text messages or talking over FaceTime as I spend in company of my friends physically, it’s just chopped up into many little moments of scrolling and liking and replying. The same was also close to true for my work: even while working in an office, many client meetings were held virtually as well as meetings between offices on different costs. The Covid-19 pandemic has further accelerated this trend.

I’m finding that one of the most important things for me is to really double down on the deeply human qualities:

1/ I have enjoyed going for extended walks outside with a new friend and coworker in my ears, having what we at Implement call REAL conversations.
2/ I also enjoy not doing screen sharing and instead opting for fewer and simpler slides that I draw by hand and hold up to the camera. It makes it feel so much more intuitive for me to present virtually and I can feel the audience much better.
3/ And lastly I enjoy facilitating reflection, especially when I manage to get a group of people together like I did recently with Janus Boye. There is something so beautiful and simple about a group of strangers coming together to process and share their experiences in life.

As always, if there is any way I can help you get started (or go further) with REAL conversations, drawing slides by hand or facilitating reflection, I would be honored help you. Just get in touch via WhatsApp on +4522212355 (my e-mail is a mess). It’s my humble attempt to share what has helped me the most.

With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.27 A whole new world, and one thing you can do about it

Hello amazing!

The Corona-pandemic has upended lives everywhere. At first I felt a great loss and sense of disappointment. We just moved to Copenhagen to be closer to family, not to be isolated at home. Then adjusting to work from home with kids running around. 

It’s still a major challenge, and I’m not here to peddle a quick-fix or “seven magic tricks.” However, there’s one thing I’ve kept returning to and that’s the shift I’ve tried to illustrate below in the Cynefin framework.

Before the crisis a large part of our world seemed to behave in ways that were complicated. This meant that with the right expertise, analysis and planning we could reasonably predict the relationship between cause and effect.

But now we are in a completely new territory: it’s complex. There are feedback loops which behave in unpredictable ways. And what the Cynefin framework teaches us is that to succeed in the complex domain we need to probe the system with intent and observe the reaction before we probe again. 

For me, the single most helpful thing I’ve done throughout the past decade, especially when navigating new territory, is reflection with pen and paper. It helps me process my experiences and emotions and surface insights that I can use. It’s not a magic quick-fix and it requires effort. But it helps in small and important ways. 

If you would like to get started with reflection and begin building a habit, I would be honored help you. Just get in touch via WhatsApp on +4522212355 (my e-mail is a mess). It’s my humble attempt to share freely what has helped me the most. I also plan to record a few guided reflections (like a guided meditation) and share as a podcast. 

I hope you’ll mostly keep up the good spirits (and be kind and gently with yourself when you can’t) 

With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.26 Aim to do the right things poorly

Hello amazing!
It’s been a while since I last wrote a new Think Clearly newsletter. One month ago we moved from Brooklyn to Copenhagen and I’ve started a new job with Implement Consulting Group which is very exciting. Yesterday I was in my first delivery, in a workshop with a leadership team and we talked about the matrix above. In a changing world, incumbent companies are at great risk of drifting gradually from the top left towards the top right: you keep on doing what you do well, even if it’s less relevant. It’s also easy for incumbent firms to dismiss a startup, since many successful startups initially obsess over being in the left column, even if they are in the bottom left. Chances are that they will learn and move upward. Lastly, I thought about it on an individual level, as I am new in this job. I’m trying to remind myself that if I want to do the right things well, I need to first be open to what the right things are, instead of sticking with my experience and just doing what I do well. 

What insights does this 2×2 give you in your current situation? Where are you? Which direction are you trying to move? 

Also, if you are in or near Copenhagen and would like to grab coffee, please let me know. 

With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.25 Are you doing the right homework?

Hello amazing!
I love reminding other people how real learning can be quite hard while I tend to believe that this somehow doesn’t apply to me, only to be shocked when it’s suddenly my turn. Alas, the past months have been challenging. This is what I’ve learned about myself: for most of the past decade I have shown up in life as an artist, meaning: regardless of the situation or moment I’ve generally done whatever I wanted to do. It’s a bit like going to class, pretending that all classes are art classes, but lately I’ve found myself in situations where the expectations of me are different. Now I gotta figure out what each moment is actually about ahead of time, and make sure I do the right homework for it. 

How do you know what your ‘homework’ is in each moment? 

With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.24 Might someone take advantage of you?

Hello Amazing!
Two weeks ago I wrote about ‘being dangerous’—a topic that is still swirling around my head. One reader pointed out that it might actually not be about intent, but also if someone perceives your interest to be aligned or unaligned to their own. For example, if you have good intent, for example when creating change in the world, but your interests go against someone else’s (the people who want to preserve what is) then they will still view you as dangerous. Thanks for pushing my thinking.

For today I’ve been further exploring what dangerous actually looks like under different circumstances. For example, in a lawful society most physical violence and threats of violence are forbidden, and it’s hard to get away with, at least in the long run. For most of us it’s an effective deterrence. But lawful society doesn’t cover all aspects. What about the small slights? Someone taking credit for your work or trying to plant harmful rumors about you in the workplace? The little things that are hard to catch, and that someone might be able to get away with?

I struggle to write about this because it goes against my desire to believe deeply in the goodness and generosity of every person. Is this belief deeply naive? If you have built a strong and trusted network through generosity, and these people watch your back, I wonder if that is actually as good a deterrence as one can get. Or maybe I’m just suffering from pronoia—the delusion that other people are plotting my wellbeing being my back.

Please, share your thoughts on the above with me. It might take me a moment to get back to you, but I will.

With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.23 Do you dare to become dangerous?

Hello Amazing!
She said “You are dangerous! This man is dangerous!” I could see the terror in her eyes. She was afraid of me. She wasn’t kidding. She was a participant in one of the Digital Acceleration Master Classes I used to facilitate when I worked at Hyper Island, and something I had said had frightened her. I didn’t know exactly what it was that I had said that had upset her so much. My guess is that it was in the way I was advocating for more openness and transparency. Never before had I experienced someone reacting this way. In her eyes I saw myself reflected as a dangerous monster—not a pleasant sight for someone who is used to seeing a friendly, warm and gentle man in the mirror. Someone with his heart in the right place. It had not occurred to me that anyone could perceive me as being dangerous. And it has taken me nearly four years to come around to this idea and I’m still only beginning to see how it fits with my worldview and sense of self. that’s why this issue is a bit longer and more open ended than usual.

The way I see it currently is that there are two fundamental choices. The first choice is if you intend to do good or evil. The second choice is how much power you seek to have. Becoming powerful, however, is not an instant choice. You have to keep at it consistently over time. Every day you can choose to try to become more powerful or less powerful. Once you become powerful it seems to stick. Once you learn to shoot a gun, to yield a sword, to speak persuasively or to hack into a secret database, your skills won’t just go away. The trouble is that your first choice is less stable. Today you might intend to be good. But what happens if someone harms you or your family? Can you be sure that you won’t suddenly decide to use your accumulated power to seek revenge? You can’t be competent without also being dangerous. But with such capacity for evil, might it be better to avoid power and remain harmless? I don’t think so, yet I wonder if there is an upper limit on how powerful one should become.

What do you think? Are you willing to be dangerous?

With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.22 Are you valuing direct reach more than close connection?

Hello Amazing!
In the past few years I’ve felt my social influence to be waning. I get less likes on Instagram than ever before. On LinkedIn and Facebook it’s near zero, so I’ve just stopped using these. My newsletter audience has been stagnant for years. I don’t like to admit it, but this stuff bothers me.
However, a few weeks ago the danish-american author Lars AP, known for his creation of the ‘Fucking Friendly’ movement came to visit. And as we talked it occurred to me that I find it so much more satisfying to have a single mutually inspiring conversation, than any number of likes or clicks. It also made me re-think how I consider my actual ‘reach’—if I can be a source of inspiration for people who reach millions, perhaps that’s enough. How do you think about reach and influence? And what’s most important to you?
With much love

— Mathias

p.s. if you are in Europe, I’ll be speaking at the Digital Leadership Conference in Aarhus, Denmark (my hometown)—and let me know if you’re interested in attending

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Volume 7

#7.21 Prepare to receive some feedback

Hello Amazing!
I’ve been fascinated with feedback for a long time. Why most people (incl. myself) do it so rarely, how it works, how it feels, and how it might be better. Most recently it occurred to me that as I listen to someone giving me valuable feedback, I’m constantly worried about what they might say next, while secretly hoping to hear something super positive. In preparation for a feedback session I tried to write these things down in advance: 

1) What I was hoping to hear (I was in a tough moment, unsure of myself and my contribution and was really hoping to hear some positive validation)
2) What I realistically could expect to hear (I know I haven’t been very proactive lately, so I could easily expect to hear that, which made it less scary) 
3) What I was trying to understand. 

How do you prepare yourself to give and get feedback? 

With much love  — Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.20 To break an undesirable habit

Hello Amazing!
I’m not against smartphones or technology in general, but I find the habit-making trigger—action—reward feedback loop to be much too powerful to control. My willpower just isn’t strong enough to resist the constant temptation of quickly checking my phone, and thus I found myself looking at it for hours every day. Until I had enough. I added a 35-digit password to unlock my phone. This is a huge obstacle! Whenever I’m triggered to look at my phone and see the prompt I usually just give up and put it away again. It’s annoying. And that’s the point. The effect is that I’ve broken habit that I found undesirable. What habits do you have, that are undesirable to you, and how might you interject an obstacle to help break it? 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.19 Executing the wrong idea

Hello Amazing!
I used to worry about finding the right idea, so that I wouldn’t waste effort on executing the wrong thing. Then I learned that I could minimize the risk of going with the wrong idea by executing really fast (many of my projects were birthed this way). But in my work at SYPartners I’m learning a third path: we pick the best idea that we have (even it it might not be perfect) and then we execute it really really really well. When we show it to our client, new ideas inevitably come up, but it turns out the execution isn’t wasted. A surprisingly large amount of it can be re-used, because it was executed well. I’m trying to apply the same method to my book writing as I’m working with my editor Helen. The book we have agreed to write together right now might not be right. But writing it well will (hopefully) help in the same way.  
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.18 How feedback can kill your personal project

Hello Amazing!
I am a huge believer in personal projects (this newsletter is my favorite example of one of my own). I’ve gotten a lot of constructive feedback on my work, which has helped me improve the quality. Feedback is seen mostly as a universal good. However, when it comes to personal projects I have also found that feedback can have a significant cost in terms of depressing my motivation, which is the only energy that drives the project forward. For example I recently asked for constructive feedback on my podcast from someone and while their points were all valid, the most immediate effect was that I stopped recording altogether. My motivation was already fragile and I think asking for feedback in that moment was a mistake because it took out the last bit of motivation. I beleive this is a general point when it comes to asking for feedback on your personal projects: no matter how valuable the feedback is it won’t matter if it it kills the energy that moved your project forward. So when someone suggests that you should ask for more feedback, first take stock at your motivation and ask yourself: can I afford the associated loss of motivation or will it kill the project entirely? 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.17 How do you figure out what is meaningful in your life?

Hello Amazing!
The world I live in is always trying to sell me something that promises to make my life more convenient. However, I think there’s wisdom in inconvenience. I’ve noticed that all the things that are really meaningful and important in my life involve lots of inconvenience. From the deliberate act of ironing my own shirts and baking bread (which dictates most of my schedule in my free time) to the raising three kids (with all their eye infections, broken bones and bad dreams) to name just a few of the things I’ve willingly chosen to bring into my life. What are your favorite inconveniences and what have they taught you? 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.16 The anatomy of mentorship

Hello Amazing!
Throughout my life I have had many mentors who have believed in me, supported me, challenged me and inspired me.* From an uncle who was willing to attempt an explanation of molecular structures when I was a very young child, to leaders who have guided me through major life transitions. I am eternally grateful. However, I recently realized that I have also been holding on emotionally to some of the relationships of the past, with a negative attachment. A mix of mourning and guilt related to the way the mentoringrelationship seemed to just gradually fade out. I think this is unnecessary. In Robert Greene’s book Mastery he writes about how it’s inevitable that you will grow apart. Perhaps it’s a good thing.  
With much love  

— Mathias

(*) My mentors, both past and present: Thomas V., Mike J., Klaus M., Jakob L., Annemette U., Carsten W., Rasmus V., Michael K., Susan K., Fabian P., Nico L., Kane S., Nilofer M., Dave G., Tom K., Dev A., Lisa M., Marcus G., Thomas P., Sarah G.

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Volume 7

#7.15 Give your students a direct experience of the problem

Hello Amazing!
While writing about facilitation and teaching I’ve been interviewing people I admire for their teaching skills. One of them is Mattan Griffel, who currently teaches programming at Columbia Business School. One of his brilliant insights was to give his students challenges that required knowledge that he hadn’t taught yet. Some groups figured it out anyway because they began searching for an answer on their own. And those who didn’t, had at least experienced the problem, so when he introduced the solution later, they understood how it would help them. And either way it builds their stamina for being in the frustration. I think this can be applied far beyond programming. 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.14 When unexpected events occur, look for feedback loops

Hello Amazing!
As an airplane nerd I have been following the recent 737 Max 8 crashes, trying to figure out my own point of view on the tragedies. As details emerged I sketched out this diagram of two interlocking and reinforcing feedback loops, one showing how investing in ever more sophisticated technology makes it more useful, and another showing how more useful technology allows us to delegate more authority to technology. However, as technology gradually gains more authority, and become harder to understand, the invisible risk of fatal failure also gradually increases. 
My point here is not that technology is bad. But I do think it’s useful to be aware of feedback loops that consistently push a system in one direction. ROI is always visible. Risk is not as visible until after it goes wrong. You can apply the same thinking to self-driving cars and the Nasdaq flash crash. 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.13 When I have a bad day

Hello Amazing!
I’m constantly checking myself, maintaining awareness of how I feel in each moment. I find that this is useful in many situations, but not always. When, on a rare occasion, I am having a not-so-great day, this constant attention to myself isn’t helpful, so I’ve been trying instead to think of someone else, and focus on showing up to be helpful to them. I explained all this to a colleague. “Ah!” she said, “You are adulting!” 
I guess that sums it up 🙂 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.12 1:1 feedback or a self-reinforcing loop

Hello Amazing!
A lot of people have asked my about my teaching practice both at Parsons and in my own workshops. One of my principles, is to avoid relying too much on 1:1 feedback with each student, and instead focus on first building a very safe but also ambitious space amongst the students, where they learn from each other. This can build a self-reinforcing mechanism. That way, once I do give some more direct insight to one person, there’s a chance that these ideas will spread amongst them and be amplified. This idea, and many more of my ideas and principles around facilitation and learning, I’m trying to put together into a coherent whole (aka. a book). If you want to help me by giving feedback on super early book drafts, please share your contact info here
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.11 Useful checklists and inspiring speeches

Issue 7.11

Hello Amazing!
In the work I do every day at SYPartners and beyond, I am frequently asked to help with such things as “company values” or “strategic vision” or “purpose statement”. It’s always interesting, especially when we discuss not just the content but also how it works in practice: why will any employee think or act in any different way because there is a new purpose statement? Some people seem to prefer much more clear directives, describing behaviors that employees should do, or a checklists and process maps. I don’t think any way is the right way, but I like to think of them on a spectrum of leadership modes: from the abstract and inspiring to the concrete and directive. The best is when we recognize what each end of the spectrum is good for and use it for that. 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.10 Instead of teaching people everything you know…

Issue 7.10

Hello Amazing!
I’m working on a draft of a book about my teaching philosophy. One of the core tenants is about helping people build confidence in exploring and learning on their own. But how do you practically do that, and how can you use your expertise in a meaningful way? The way I have been thinking about it, is to think of all my expert knowledge as a large field of data. It’s tempting to take people on a guided tour around this field and show them everything. However, instead I try to use my expertise to design really good challenges for people. I give them a clear starting point, a direction to explore and a goal of where they should try to get to. Ideally, having people work in teams, allow them to explore different pathways toward the destination. In the end the teams have discovered many of the elements of the field and can teach each other their different discoveries. For example, I have used this when teaching people software. Without telling them much, I used my expertise to give them a really good starting point, and just enough knowledge that they could build something functional on their own, in very little time. 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.09 When will you pull through, even if something is going wrong?

Issue 7.09

Hello Amazing!
I’m fascinated with airplanes, especially how they are built to be safe, by designing for the critical things that can go wrong. For example, what do you do if an engine fails during take-off? As the plane accelerates down the runway it will reach a speed where it is not yet fast enough to fly, but going so fast that it can’t stop safely either. This speed is called V1, and it varies depending on aircraft and weather conditions. At this speed the pilot will no longer abort the take-off. Even if an engine explodes, the other engine will keep accelerating the plane until it can lift off. I love that there is this in-between area, where you have to do something counter-intuitive in the event of a failture. It made me think of my own (less dangerous) work, where there are also times where a project can be in trouble, team members get sick, and yet you have to make it work anyway. In your work, what’s the V1 point? How do you know if you’ve reached it? Is there a similarly counter-intuitive move that helps? 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.08 When people around you worry

Issue 7.08

Hello Amazing!
This week I worked a lot with someone who seemed very worried about the work we were doing. I wasn’t worried at all. At least I wasn’t in the beginning. But after two days I found myself not able to sleep at night, getting increasingly stressed out. Finally I realized that I had simply adopted someone else’s worry. It wasn’t really mine. I just felt their worry. This didn’t fully resolve the stress, but once I could recognize it as someone else’s, I could more easily let it go, and at least reduce the stress, think more clearly and make some actual progress. 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.07 Work as an investment portfolio

Issue 7.06

Hello Amazing!
About a month ago I started working full time at SYPartners, a consulting firm in NYC where I have freelanced in the past, and that I truly love. These first five weeks have been nothing less than amazing.
Shifting from freelance to full time employment, however, affects how much time and energy I spend on short, medium and long term work. I think of it like an investment portfolio, with a mix of assets to achieve the right balance of risk and stability. As an independent I spent roughly half my time delivering client work, 35% on relationships and selling new work, and the rest on more long term ideas like this newsletter and my podcast. With a job, almost all my time is spent on short term work, which is how it should be, but I’m intentionally using a bit of what’s left on ‘very long term’ work, in this case a book. I have hired a freelance editor that I have worked with in the past, to help me gather my ideas and create some order. 
How are you balancing your work portfolio? and are you getting the desired outcomes? 
With much love  

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.06 Gift or debt?

Hello Amazing!
While I was on summer vacation with my wife and our kids, I would often take the kids in the morning and let my wife sleep in. We called this “the gift of sleep” and it’s a gift she really enjoys. However, there were days were I was so exhausted myself that I couldn’t really afford to give this gift. I needed sleep too. But I tried to give it anyway, and failing to be honest with myself, I didn’t realize that I would expect her to reciprocate. Suddenly the “gift” of sleep had become a debt. She owed me. Obviously this didn’t work well. Now, I try to remember that generosity is great, but that I shouldn’t give something if I can’t afford to really give it. Nobody wants a debt. Have you ever done this? Or been the recipient?
With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.05 Shit and Diamonds

Hello Amazing!
In some ways it’s almost so obvious that it’s not worth saying: if you want high quality output you need a combination of creative output and a good editor who can filter the shit from the diamonds. Yet, because it feels so obvious I also tend to forget and I need to remind myself again and again. Today I realized that I hadn’t written a newsletter for more than two months. In my desire to improve the quality of my work I had stepped up my inner editor to a point where I couldn’t produce any output at all, and while I’m still interested in increasing quality and becoming a better editor, I’m not willing to do so at the cost of all output. So today I am sharing a first draft. Maybe it’s a diamond. Maybe it’s just shit. Either way: I wanted to do something.
Perhaps you need a reminder too?
With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.04 Projecting into the future

Hello Amazing! I think that we humans are always trying to understand. We look around us and we try to figure out how the world works. Because if we understand it correctly, we might begin to predict (at least with some probability) what might happen in the future. Unfortunately, some of us are sometimes too quick to jump to conclusions which are only partially true. For example, I find that a linear understanding is particularly seductive. We think that learning happens in linear, additive manner (Economics 101, 201, 301 etc.), that they build their endurance for long-distance running linearly, that the path to enlightenment is a series of sequential steps. The risk is that we miss cyclical, seasonal and other non-linear patterns.
The image is further distorted if we also begin to conflate our ability to predict with an ability to control. If we set higher ‘targets’ (for sales, people growth, test scores, GDP..) we think that the flowers will grow faster. But that will be for another day.

With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.03 Replaced by robots

Hello Amazing! How good do you feel you are in doing your job? Do you feel that you know what you are doing and how it all works or is it more messy? When it comes to automating work using Machine Learning it’s the tasks that have the most clearly defined (or definable) inputs and outputs that will be automated first. So if your job feels really really really messy, it’s probably because it’s harder to automate.

With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.02 — Manage your ambition

Hello Amazing! In order to achieve anything, we have to set high standards for ourselves. However, for many of us this leads to a sense of inadequacy, because we are not able to meet those high standards. It’s tempting to lower our standards and in some situations, it might be the best thing, especially if it’s something that’s just not very important for us. But for the stuff that matters most, the real trick is to add time. To be patient and persistent. Sometimes radically so. For the most daunting quests I recommend thinking across multiple lifetimes.

With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 7

#7.01 — Stay or quit?

Hello Amazing! If you are in a relationship, a job, a marriage, a city or something else, and it doesn’t feel right, how do you know if it’s best to stay and try to fix it or to leave and go elsewhere? I think it’s easy to be seduced by the idea that something look good on paper (“the job pays well”, “the city is full of opportunity”). It’s also easy to look at something and only see what’s missing. What might be best is to look for the roots. The deep essentials. What do you think? Have you mistakenly left something that actually had roots? Or are you stuck in something that sounds great, but doesn’t have roots?

With much love

— Mathias

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Volume 6

#6.24 — Draw a frame and give ideas room to breathe

 

In celebrations of my friend Dev Aujla’s new book, 50 Ways to Get a Job.

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Volume 6

#6.23 — do you feel guilty if you don’t care enough?

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Volume 6

#6.22 An intimate relationship to one person

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Volume 6

#6.21 Learning new skills through projects

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Volume 6

#6.20 Really messy problems

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Volume 6

#6.19 — intangible portfolio

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Volume 6

#6.18 — inside and outside the box

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#6.17 — They have something you think you want

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Volume 6

#6.16 — Optimize the soul out of it

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#6.15 — Consulting and empathy

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#6.14 — life is like walking on a narrow bridge

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#6.13 — I’m not as tired as I think

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#6.12 — When real help feels like a roadblock

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#6.11 — illusions of safety

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#6.10 — Asking for help

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#6.09 My ideology is “safe+uncomfortable”

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Volume 6

#6.08 Shifting your thinking by shifting your tools

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Volume 6

#6.07 Compete or collaborate?

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#6.06 Leading without authority

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#6.05 Humanity At Hyper Speed

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#6.04 Motivation staircase

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Volume 6

#6.03 Off-balance conversations

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Volume 6

#6.02 Leadership and blind spots

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Volume 6

#6.01 Harness the power of your imagination

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Volume 5

#5.22 Your ideal role on a team

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Volume 5

#5.21 when you are not doing “it”

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5.20: How knowing it all limits learning

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#5.19 working on the edges

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#518: your work without prestige

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#517: complexity and confidence

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#516: four steps to mastery

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#515: Limit the feedback, limit the learning

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#514: it’s hard to ask for what I really need, sometimes

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Volume 5

#513: My judgements get in the way of building trust

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#512: how high should you aim?

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#511: About being in balance

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#510: A Big Dream and a tiny first step

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#509: Insecurities leading to doing more stuff

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 5

#508: Useful projections, getting my ego hurt and letting go

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

 

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#507: Time and space for ups and downs

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#506 Is your value in your time or in your accumulated genius?

  

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#505: Read to validate your own world or to understand someone else’s

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#504: Are you tired of chasing goals?

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

 

Read also the blog post Sarah and I wrote about chasing goals.

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Volume 5

#503: Shifting feelings

Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen
Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

See also my Medium post with an actual example of this process.

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Volume 5

#502: Convenient excuses to avoid being curious

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

Inspired by Micke

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#501: two ways of using notebooks

  

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Volume 4

#425: I dream about one day playing a rock concert in a stadium

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#424: How to structure your thoughts with pen and paper

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#423: Optimize your learning through reflection and the Well of Knowledge

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#422: How to create an amazing newsletter (very meta!)

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#421: You can win or be right

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#420: Deal with your endless to-do list

Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen
Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

Hello amazing!

Are you feeling overwhelmed and losing focus?

Try this…

  1. Do a mind map of what you are working on: list all projects
  2. Sort each subject into these five buckets:
    1. 1, 2, or 3 things to do with special care and attention.
    2. keep going
    3. pause for 6 months or more
    4. do with explicitly reduced commitment
    5. stop doing

Let me know how this works for you.

With love,

Mathias

Oct 5, 2015 Winston Churchill Square

 

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Volume 4

#419: Decision scenarios

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#418: Your perfect tools for an imperfect reality

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#417: Your own formula for success

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#416: Deeper conversations

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

Meaningful Conversation

Hello  amazing!

Omri  reached out to me via instant chat:” How can I have more meaningful conversations?”  Here’s one way to begin.

People

1. It’s not for everyone. Make a list of 5 to 10 people you think might be interested in going deeper.

Place

2. The place you meet has a big impact on the conversation. Draw a place that you think would be ideal. Find an actual place that is a bit like that.

Topic

3. Personal topics are good. Take them to extremes: highest ambitions, biggest fears, death.

Try it!  Practice. And hit me on chat to let me know how it goes.

With love,

Mathias

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#415: Be a change agent with this map

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Volume 4

#414 Is your endless to-do list sucking out your energy?

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

 

Hello amazing!

How do you handle an endless to-do list? If it sucks the energy out of you, here’s a way you can try:

  1. Take your list or rewrite it from memory (good practice- see what is top of mind).
  2. Sort into three buckets based on best fit.

Bucket A: “Could do” (Don’t worry)

Bucket B: “Should do” (Do later)

Bucket C: “Want to do” (Creates energy)

3. Don’t worry about bucket a schedule time later for items in bucket B. And pick one item from C and enjoy doing it. Use that energy for bucket B.

With love,

Mathias

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Volume 4

#413 Should you quit your job?

Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen
Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

Hello amazing!

A friend recently asked me for advice on whether to quit this job. Stay in the well-known with good and bad or jump into the unknown.

I offered this quote from illusions by Richard Bach:

Don’t turn away from possible futures before you’re certain you don’t have anything to learn from them.

Whether my job is frustrating (it is!) I always come back to this: there is so much more to learn.

With love,

Mathias

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Volume 4

#412: Create a fictional character for yourself

 

Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen
Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

 

Hello amazing!

Imagine you are an actor and executive producer for a new TV show, and you can have the writers create and shape the fictional character to be exactly the way you want to be. Which character do you want to play?

  • Lead character or support?
  • How does he/she look? What does he/she wear?
  • What main character attributes do you want to have?
Reminder

You don’t have to be realistic- you don’t even need to try to become –? like this fantasy character. Just enjoy creating and imagining. See where it goes.

With love,

M ❤️

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Volume 4

#411: Reasons why you are an amazing person

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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#410 — The power of openness

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

 

The benefits of openness

Hello amazing!

Have you ever worried about your Facebook privacy settings? Your kids (or future kids) privacy? What if we flip it all around: instead of trying to control and defend privacy, we assume that nothing will be secret forever- so we should simply stop saying mean things… My friend Joauim(@Jocke) takes it further: he is a busy man with lots of requests for his time so he has made his personal calendar 100% public!

The result is that others organize themselves around him without any effort for him.

– What information do you currently keep private, that might benefit you, if public?
– What information might help others?

❤️With Love

Mathias

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters

409 — What is your kryptonite?

Hello amazing! What’s your kryptonite?

A few weeks ago, before a big client delivery, my amazing friend and coworker hazel(@hazeliz) asked our team the question above. What is that thing that makes you lose your super powers? To my horror, I couldn’t answer the question. I didn’t know. For the next week I kept pondering, until I realized that for me do the role of facilitator (at Hyper Island) my kryptonite is that I want to be liked. This prevents me from pushing our participants towards new learnings. But now I know this, and this past week I challenged myself to go past it. What’s your kryptonite?

With love,

M

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 4

#408 How do you view your friendships

Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen
Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

 

Hello amazing!

Do you define your friendships based on your shard past or the imagined potential futures? Try this to find out. First, make a list of your best friends and make a note of how many years you’ve known each other(roughly). Second, make a list of the people you have met recently(past 6-18 months) who have made a big impression on you.

-Compare lists
-Are there overlaps?
-If you knew they felt the same way with you, who would you rather spend your time with tomorrow?
-Find your own conclusion of this. It’s probably correct.

With Love ❤️M

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 4

#407 Better decisions with ThinkKit

thinkkit

 

Hello amazing!

Today 53 announced the new version of the paper, including Think Kit. It’s an amazing new set of simple and intuitive tools that turns paper into the most powerful digital thinking tool I have ever tried. For example, you can use it to map out complex decision scenarios like the example below. When you run out of space you can use the cut tool to quickly re-arrange. You can read more about complex decisions on the link below.

With love,

Mathias

April 23, 2015

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 4

#406 Using your inner critic for good

innercritic

 

Hello amazing!

Two weeks ago, on April 7th, 2015, our daughter Uma was born. A very special day- especially because it’s also the day my mother would have turned 56. Uma is healthy, eating and sleeping and we are tired and happy parents. ❤️

Before Uma was born I was working on a project, and although it seemed to be going really well, I was overwhelmed with a highly critical voice in my head. I had this flood of negative thoughts- mainly unconstructive criticism of what everyone around me was doing. My friend and mentor Sarah suggested that I just write it all down instead of trying to ignore it, and it really helped. Seeing it on paper allowed me to find the useful 2%.

Critic-> Write it down-> Filter with appreciation-> Trash 98%-> 2%

The useful 2% helped me see where we were relative to where we want to be, creating creative tension.

Where you are -> “pull” creative tension-> Where you want to be

With love,

Mathias

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Volume 4

#405 How to change your beliefs (and live the life you want)

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Hello amazing!
You are always free to believe anything you want to believe. Anything! Even if it directly contradicts the so-called “facts.” Their are people still don’t believe in climate change and santa claus, despite piles on evidence. Here’s how you do it:

1. What do you want to believe?(Key to happiness here. Your choice!) For example, I want to be beautiful I have beauty so why not believe I am?
2. Do you currently believe that? If not, then what exactly do you believe about the chosen topic? e.g. I believe that I am of pretty average physical appearance. (The “fact”).
3. Use creativity to invent supporting theories and beliefs that explain away any inconvenient “facts” and make it easy to believe what you stated above. e.g. “Real beauty comes through the way you smile with your eyes.” That makes it easier to believe for me. (Get creative!)
4. Lastly, if you truly believed what you stated in 2) then how would your actions and behaviours be different? For me, I would walk with better posture, and smile more. Begin acting this way, and quickly your new belief will be real.

Repeat until you’re satisfied.

With love,
Mathis

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Volume 4

#403 Aspiring to be super-human (and not a robot)

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Hello amazing!

I aspire to be super-human!

But sometimes I misunderstand my own intention. Super-human is not about being above or beyond the qualities that make us human:

  • Limits: physical, mental and emotional
  • Feelings and emotions
  • Warmth, love and care
  • Learning and growing
  • Creativity.

Without these we become efficient like robots. At least for me, super-human means more of all of the above. Not less. What kind of human do you aspire to be?

With love,

Mathias.

 

(Traduction française disponible)

#403 FR

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Volume 4

#402 Can you avoid negative productivity?

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Hello amazing!

We talk a lot about being productive and efficient: get sh-t done. But in creative work, I think the biggest risk is not low productivity but negative productivity. That is, when what you do create more distracting work for you(and others). And you would be better off if you just stopped. This week, try to notice if you get into negative.

With love.

Mathias

 

(Traduction française disponible)

#402

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Volume 4

#401 Perfectionism and true aspiration

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Hello amazing! And welcome to 2015. I recently found myself beating myself up for not living up to my own standards. Why? I kept telling myself that I need high standards to grow. What was missing was a perspective of time. Without time there is no aspiration, just perfectionism = focus on always being not good enough. Give yourself time.

With love,

Mathias

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Volume 3

#306 Two loops for learning and growing

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Hello Amazing!

Are you balancing your doing and thinking?

Try to map your everyday activities onto the two-loop model above. Which of the two loops is more dominant? In order to learn and grow, I think it is essential to have a mix of activities that stimulate both loops. Simply reading new stuff is not enough- but getting caught in unreflected, perpetual doing also limits you. Look at your loops. If you could add one new activity, what would it be?

With love,

Mathias

Nov 25, 2014

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Volume 3

#305: Manage peak frustration when someone pushes your buttons

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Volume 3

#304: How to handle people who look down upon you

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Volume 3

#303: Work as a stage performance

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Volume 3

#302: Do you care too much to perform optimally?

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Volume 3

#301: Your sphere of control

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#214 – where do you live – and where are you going?

newsletter_214

I never thought about it before, but I have realized this week that for most of my life I have been camping out on the shores of reality. Beyond the norms and rules of the so-called real world. It has been great but I also know deep inside that is is time for me to come back to the real world. And it scares me. Living at the frontier can be scary but I’m used to that. For me, the real world is truly the unknown. I don’t think it is better to live at the frontier, but I think it is important to understand where you actually live— and to ask herself if you are in the right place. Try this:

1. Draw your own map -it may look different

2. Where do you live and where do you go to? Perhaps you live in the real world and work as a person who takes people on tours to the frontier. Maybe you live in between.

3. Where do you really want to be?

The real world:
-Social norms
-Rules
-Code
-Rigidity and stability

With love,

Mathias

(Traduction française disponible)

#214 FR

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Volume 2

#213SPECIAL Special edition: Thank you!

HELLO AMAZING!

A few times a month, you and roughly 1800 others receive this newsletter in their inboxes. To me this is absolutely incredible, and I want to thank you for investing a little bit of time in me, in this newsletter and in yourself. In order to show my appreciation and to remind myself what 1800 people looks like I have drawn a picture of you all. Actually it’s too drawing because I couldn’t fit you all on one page. See pictures below…

[Aside]: As always, let me know if I can help.

Special Exercise: Assess Your Impact

1. Grab your notebook and a pen

2. Prepare a page 5 by drawing a beautiful frame along the edge

Draw all the people who are affected by your work

If you have 100s or 1000s, just draw stick figures

If you have your fewer, try adding details. Names, how you know them. Give them a face.

Look at each person remember that they are each real people.

With love,

Mathias

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#213 – the inner WHY

newsletter_213

HELLO AMAZING!

Learn how to find a strong and motivating “inner why.”

Grab pen and notebook and frame a page:

Give it a title. It can be the name of a project or task that you are working on now.

2. In the top-right corner, leave space for exploring all your motivations for doing this project.

Why do you want to do this?

Optional: add little icons to each reason.

3. Look at each of your reasons, and ask yourself:

-Is this something I’m trying to avoid?(Loosing my job, making mistakes, failing)

-Is this within my control or is it a result ties to others?(Success, positive feedback)

4. Focus on the motivations that don’t fit the questions in 3.

These are your INTRINSIC motivations and they will help and guide you through uncertainty.

With love,

Mathias

 

(Traduction française disponible)

#213 FR

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#212 – staircase of abstraction

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#211 – what should I do now?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#209 – what are you maximizing for?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#207 – fear

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#206 – I love what I do

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#205 – thinking about marriage

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(Traduction française disponible)

#205

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#204 – What if I was asked to give a TED talk?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#203 – the art of life

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#202 – think of yourself as a human capital fund

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Photo of a Think Clearly handwritten newsletter created by Mathias Jakobsen

newsletter_202

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 2

#201 – How to squeeze the wisdom out of 2013

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#115 – Serious shopping or how to spend a billion $

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#114 – Tell me something about yourself

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#113 – Turkey, birthday and looking back to life as an awkward teenager.

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#112 – You decide what you want to believe.

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#111 – What would your dream company look like?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#110 – Mariah doesn’t do stairs. What will you not do?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#109 – What are you doing these days?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#108 – What to do when shit hits the fan?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#107 – This week we do lunches with friends and fly private jets.

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#106 – How do you frame your expertise?

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#105 – play with prices

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Thinking Clearly — Archive of past newsletters Volume 1

#104 – compete with Elon Musk using mental satellites