What if you don’t want my help?

Thinking clearly and having freedom to succeed on your own terms sounds great. But you don’t want my help. You’d rather figure it out on your own. I get it. Because that’s how I do most things too. There’s real joy and accomplishment in finding your own path and not being overly reliant on anyone.

When someone wants to sell me an online course for $499 I know that most of those ideas are probably also available in a handful of books, and I prefer buying the books.

There are two main books that I have come across, which seem to articulate more than 95% of what I am teaching people and they are so lovely.

Illusions by Richard Bach

A short novella narrated by a character who claims to be the author, about his encounters one summer with a messiah named Donald Shimoda. The story is goofy and yet profound and simple. Ever since I first read it, I have enjoyed reading this book over and over, typically every six months or so. Each time it reminds me that the world I live in, and all its rules and systems, is not always quite what we think it is.

Liminal Thinking by Dave Gray

If Illusions is like an entertaining and profound movie, Liminal Thinking is the handbook that teaches you how to operate in this space between assumptions, values and beliefs. Think Clearly isn’t based on this book, however, it articulates so incredibly well what it’s all about and how you can do it.

If you read these two books, you will be well on your way.